Dodd-Frank.com

A Compensation Plan That Didn’t Work

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HP’s Chief Executive Officer, Mark Hurd, resigned after an investigation disclosed that Hurd had a “close personal relationship” with an H-P contractor hired by the Office of the CEO and that “Mark never disclosed that.”  According to HP’s General Counsel, “there were instances of compensation and reimbursement for services that were... Read More

Topics: Banking, Employment, Executive Compensation, Public Companies and Securities

Representing Compensation Committees — Regular Counsel Need Not Apply?

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The Dodd-Frank Act contains a number of provisions designed to improve the independence and operations of Compensation Committees.  But in doing so, has Congress made it more difficult – if not impossible – for a company’s regular outside law firm to assist its Comp Committee? The Act provides that a... Read More

Topics: Executive Compensation, Litigation, Public Companies and Securities

Dodd-Frank and Minnesota Investment Advisers

The Interaction Between Dodd-Frank and Minnesota Regulation of Investment Advisers Before enactment of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the following rules applied under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940: The Investment Advisers Act precluded investment advisers with less than $25 million in assets under management from... Read More

Topics: Private Equity, Public Companies and Securities

Whistleblowers, Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley

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The Dodd-Frank Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act both have provisions for whistleblowers.  Public companies need to be familiar with all of these provisions. The Dodd-Frank Act provides that if a “whistleblower” provides “original information” in certain judicial or administrative actions, the whistleblower may be entitled to as much as 10... Read More

Topics: Employment, Litigation, Public Companies and Securities