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Drafting 10-K Disclosures for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

by   |   January 25, 2018

Public companies with fiscal quarters ended December 31, 2017, but not fiscal year ends, are beginning to make disclosures showing the effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in recently filed Form 10-Qs in accordance with SAB 118. Some may find these disclosures as a useful starting point for drafting Form 10-K disclosures. Examples follow.

Fair Isaac

Financial Statements

The effective income tax rate was 19.6% and (32.3)% during the quarters ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The provision for income taxes during interim quarterly reporting periods is based on our estimates of the effective tax rates for the full fiscal year. The effective tax rate in any quarter can also be affected positively or negatively by adjustments that are required to be reported in the specific quarter of resolution.

The effective tax rate for the three months ended December 31, 2017 was significantly impacted by recording the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”), enacted on December 22, 2017 by the U.S. government. The Tax Act makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code that will affect our fiscal year ended September 30, 2018, including, but not limited to, (1) reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate and (2) requiring a one-time transition tax on certain un-repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries that is payable over eight years.

The Tax Act reduces the federal corporate tax rate to 21.0% effective January 1, 2018. In accordance with Section 15 of the Internal Revenue Code, we will utilize a blended rate of 24.5% for our fiscal 2018 tax year, by applying a prorated percentage of the number of days prior to and subsequent to the January 1, 2018 effective date. We recorded provisional charges for the re-measurement of the deferred tax assets of $5.6 million to our income tax expense related to long-term deferred tax assets and $1.3 million related to short-term deferred tax assets during the quarter ended December 31, 2017.

The Deemed Repatriation Transition Tax (the “Transition Tax”) is a tax on previously untaxed accumulated earnings and profits (“E&P”) of certain of our foreign subsidiaries. To determine the amount of the Transition Tax, we must determine, in addition to other factors, the amount of post-1986 E&P of the relevant subsidiaries, as well as the amount of non-U.S. income taxes paid on such earnings. We are able to make a reasonable estimate and recorded a provisional Transition Tax obligation of $4.9 million.

On December 22, 2017, the SEC issued Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB 118”), which provides guidance on accounting for tax effects of the Tax Act. SAB 118 provides a measurement period that should not extend beyond one year from the Tax Act enactment date for companies to complete the accounting under ASC 740. In accordance with SAB 118, a company must reflect the income tax effects of those aspects of the Act for which the accounting under ASC 740 is complete. To the extent that a company’s accounting for certain income tax effects of the Tax Act is incomplete but it is able to determine a reasonable estimate, it must record a provisional estimate to be included in the financial statements. If a company cannot determine a provisional estimate to be included in the financial statements, it should continue to apply ASC 740 on the basis of the provision of the tax laws that were in effect immediately before the enactment of the Tax Act. While we are able to make reasonable estimates of the impact of the reduction in corporate rate and the deemed repatriation transition tax, the final impact of the Tax Act may differ from these estimates, due to, among other things, changes in our interpretations and assumptions, additional guidance that may be issued by the I.R.S., and actions we may take. We are continuing to gather additional information to determine the final impact.

MD&A

The effective income tax rate was 19.6% and (32.3)% during the quarters ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The provision for income taxes during interim quarterly reporting periods is based on our estimates of the effective tax rates for the full fiscal year. The effective tax rate in any quarter can also be affected positively or negatively by adjustments that are required to be reported in the specific quarter of resolution. The effective tax rate for the three months ended December 31, 2017 was significantly impacted by recording the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”), enacted on December 22, 2017 by the U.S. government. Among other provisions, the Tax Act reduces the federal corporate tax rate to 21% from the existing maximum rate of 35%, effective January 1, 2018, and imposes a deemed repatriation tax on previously untaxed accumulated earnings and profits (“E&P”) of foreign subsidiaries. We remeasured our deferred tax assets using a blended rate of 24.5% — by applying a pro-rated percentage of the number of days before and after the January 1, 2018 effective date — and recorded provisional charges for the remeasurement of the deferred tax assets of $5.6 million to our income tax expense related to long-term deferred tax assets and $1.3 million related to short-term deferred tax assets during the quarter ended December 31, 2017. We also recorded a provisional charge of $4.9 million to our income tax expense for the deemed repatriation transition tax. While we are able to make reasonable estimates of the impact of the reduction in corporate rate and the deemed repatriation transition tax, the final impact of the Tax Act may differ from these estimates, due to, among other things, changes in our interpretations and assumptions, additional guidance that may be issued by the I.R.S., and actions we may take. We are continuing to gather additional information to determine the final impact.

Ethan Allen Interiors

Fiancial Statements

On December 22, 2017 H.R. 1, originally known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, (the “Tax Act”) was enacted. Among the significant changes to the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, the Tax Act lowers the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate (“Federal Tax Rate”) from 35% to 21% effective  January 1, 2018. The Company will compute its income tax expense for the  June 30, 2018 fiscal year using a blended Federal Tax Rate of 28%. The 21% Federal Tax Rate will apply to fiscal years ending  June 30, 2019 and each year thereafter.

The 28% Federal Tax Rate will apply to earnings reported for the full 2018 fiscal year. Accordingly, first quarter income previously subject to tax at the 35% Federal Tax Rate will benefit from the 28% Federal Tax Rate. The Company must re-measure its net deferred tax assets and liabilities using the Federal Tax Rate that will apply when these amounts are expected to reverse. The effect of the re-measurement is reflected entirely in the interim period that includes the enactment date and is allocated directly to income tax expense from continuing operations.

In December 2017, the Securities and Exchange Commission staff issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, which addresses how a company recognizes provisional amounts when a company does not have the necessary information available, prepared or analyzed (including computations) in reasonable detail to complete its accounting for the effect of the changes in the Tax Act. The measurement period ends when a company has obtained, prepared and analyzed the information necessary to finalize its accounting, but cannot extend beyond one year.

As of December 31, 2017, the Company can determine a reasonable estimate for certain effects of tax reform and is recording that estimate as a provisional amount. The provisional remeasurement of the deferred tax assets and liabilities resulted in a $2.6 million discrete tax benefit which lowered the effective tax rate by 14.6% in the quarter and 8.8% fiscal year to date. The provisional remeasurement amount is anticipated to change as data becomes available allowing more accurate scheduling of the deferred tax assets and liabilities primarily related to depreciable assets, inventory, employee compensation and commissions. Following is a reconciliation of income tax expense (benefit) computed by applying the federal statutory income tax rate to income before taxes to actual tax expense (benefit):

[Table Omitted]

We are still in the process of evaluating the income tax effect of the Tax Act on the executive compensation limitations that will be effective for our fiscal year 2019.

MD&A

Income tax expense year-to-date totaled $6.8 million compared to $12.9 million. Our effective tax rate was 23.5% in the period compared to 36.7%. The effective tax rate for the current year-to-date period was dramatically lower due to the Tax Act. The effective tax rate for the current fiscal year primarily includes tax expense on that fiscal year’s net income, the tax benefit lost on the cancelation of stock options and tax and interest expense on uncertain tax positions, partially offset by tax benefit from the re-measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities and the vesting of restricted stock units. The effective tax rate for the prior fiscal year primarily includes tax expense on that fiscal year’s net income, and tax and interest expense on uncertain tax positions, partially offset by the reversal and recognition of some uncertain tax positions. See Note 3, Income Taxes, for further information.

Oshkosh

Financial Statements

The Company recorded income tax expense of $4.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2017, or 7.8% of pre-tax income, compared to $5.2 million, or 21.8% of pre-tax income, for the three months ended December 31, 2016. Results for the three months ended December 31, 2017 were favorably impacted by $10.3 million of net discrete tax benefits, including a $3.3 million benefit related to share-based compensation tax deductions, and a $6.5 million net benefit related to new tax legislation in the United States. Results for the three months ended December 31, 2016 were favorably impacted by $2.8 million of discrete tax benefits, including $2.1 million of tax benefits related to the release of valuation allowances on deferred tax assets for state net operating loss carryforwards and $0.7 million related to the release of valuation allowances on deferred taxes on federal capital loss carryforwards.

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Reform Act”) was signed into law by President Trump. The Tax Reform Act significantly revised the U.S. corporate income tax regime by, among other things, lowering the U.S. corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% effective January 1, 2018, while also repealing the deduction for domestic production activities, implementing a territorial tax system and imposing a repatriation tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries. U.S. GAAP requires that the impact of tax legislation be recognized in the period in which the law was enacted. As a result of the Tax Reform Act, the Company recorded a tax benefit of $23.9 million due to a remeasurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities and a tax charge of $17.4 million due to the transition tax on deemed repatriation of deferred foreign income, in the three months ended December 31, 2017. Both of the tax benefit and the tax charge represent provisional amounts and the Company’s current best estimates. Any adjustments recorded to the provisional amounts through the first quarter of fiscal 2019 will be included in income from operations as an adjustment to tax expense. The provisional amounts incorporate assumptions made based upon the Company’s current interpretation of the Tax Reform Act and may change as the Company receives additional clarification and implementation guidance.

Because of the complexity of the new Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) tax rules, the Company continues to evaluate this provision of the Tax Reform Act and the application of ASC 740, Income Taxes. Under U.S. GAAP, the Company is allowed to make an accounting policy choice of either (1) treating taxes due on future U.S. inclusions in taxable income related to GILTI as a current-period expense when incurred (the “period cost method”) or (2) factoring such amounts into the Company’s measurement of its deferred taxes (the “deferred method”). The Company’s selection of an accounting policy with respect to the new GILTI tax rules will depend, in part, on analyzing its global income to determine whether it expects to have future U.S. inclusions in taxable income related to GILTI and, if so, what the impact is expected to be. Whether the Company expects to have future U.S. inclusions in taxable income related to GILTI depends on not only the Company’s current structure and estimated future results of global operations, but also its intent and ability to modify its structure. The Company’s currently in the process of analyzing its structure and, as a result, is not yet able to reasonably estimate the effect of this provision of the Tax Reform Act. Therefore, the Company has not made any adjustments related to potential GILTI tax in its financial statements and has not made a policy decision regarding whether to record deferred tax on GILTI.

MD&A

The Company recorded income tax expense of $4.7 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2018, or 7.8% of pre-tax income, compared to $5.2 million, or 21.8% of pre-tax income, in the first quarter of fiscal 2017. Results for the first quarter of fiscal 2018 were favorably impacted by discrete tax benefits of $10.3 million, primarily due to favorable share-based compensation tax benefits of $3.3 million and a $6.5 million net benefit related to the implementation of new tax legislation in the United States. Results for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 were favorably impacted by $2.8 million of discrete tax benefits, largely related to state tax matters.

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Reform Act”) was signed into law by President Trump. The Tax Reform Act significantly revised the U.S. corporate income tax regime by, among other things, lowering the U.S. corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, effective January 1, 2018, repealing the deduction for domestic production activities, implementing a territorial tax system and imposing a repatriation tax on deemed repatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries. As a result of the Tax Reform Act, the Company recorded a tax benefit of $23.9 million due to a remeasurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities and a tax charge of $17.4 million due to the transition tax on deemed repatriation of deferred foreign income in first quarter of fiscal 2018. Both of the tax benefit and the tax charge represent provisional amounts and the Company’s current best estimates. Any adjustments recorded to the provisional amounts through the first quarter of fiscal 2019 will be included in income from operations as an adjustment to tax expense. The provisional amounts incorporate assumptions made based upon the Company’s current interpretation of the Tax Reform Act and may change as the Company receives additional clarification and implementation guidance. As a result of tax reform, the Company anticipates that its effective tax rate, prior to discrete tax benefits, will be approximately 24.5% in fiscal 2018. Longer term, once the full effect of the lower statutory tax rate begins to impact the Company, the Company anticipates that its effective tax rate, prior to discrete tax benefits, will range between 22% and 24%. This estimate reflects the repeal of the deduction for domestic production activities and other items of the Tax Reform Act that are less beneficial.

Commvault Systems

Financial Statements

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Act reduces the US federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, requires companies to pay a one-time transition tax on earnings of certain foreign subsidiaries that were previously tax deferred and creates new taxes on certain foreign sourced earnings. As of December 31, 2017, the Company has not completed the accounting for the tax effects of enactment of the Act; however, as described below, it has made a reasonable estimate of the effects on existing deferred tax balances. These amounts are provisional and subject to change. The most significant impact of the legislation for the Company was a $24,300 reduction of the value of the Company’s net deferred tax assets (which represent future tax benefits) as a result of lowering the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%. The Act also includes a requirement to pay a one-time transition tax on the cumulative value of earnings and profits that were previously not repatriated for U.S. income tax purposes. The Company has not made sufficient progress on the transition tax analysis to reasonably estimate the effects, and therefore, has not recorded provisional amounts. However, based on analysis to date the one-time transition tax is not expected to be material. No additional income taxes have been provided for any remaining undistributed foreign earnings not subject to the transition tax, or any additional outside basis difference inherent in these entities, as these amounts continue to be indefinitely reinvested in foreign operations.

MD&A

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Act reduces the US federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, requires companies to pay a one-time transition tax on earnings of certain foreign subsidiaries that were previously tax deferred and creates new taxes on certain foreign sourced earnings. As of December 31, 2017, we have not completed the accounting for the tax effects of enactment of the Act; however, as described below, we have made a reasonable estimate of the effects on existing deferred tax balances. These amounts are provisional and subject to change. The most significant impact of the legislation for the Company was a $24.3 million reduction of the value of net deferred tax assets (which represent future tax benefits) as a result of lowering the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%. The Act also includes a requirement to pay a one-time transition tax on the cumulative value of earnings and profits that were previously not repatriated for U.S. income tax purposes. We have not made sufficient progress on the transition tax analysis to reasonably estimate the effects, and therefore, have not recorded provisional amounts. However, based on analysis to date the one-time transition tax is not expected to be material. No additional income taxes have been provided for any remaining undistributed foreign earnings not subject to the transition tax, or any additional outside basis difference inherent in these entities, as these amounts continue to be indefinitely reinvested in foreign operations.